Damp Cloth

visual-poetry:

today i received my contributors copy of »typewriter art: a modern anthology« edited by barrie tullett

the first typewriter artist to find fame was flora f. f. stacey, with her butterfly drawing of 1898; but since the very beginning of the typewriter’s existence, artists, designers, poets and writers have used this rigorous medium to produce an astounding range of creative work.

this beautiful book brings together some of the best examples by typewriter artists around the world. as well as key historical work from the bauhaus, h. n. werkman and the concrete poets, there is art by contemporary practitioners, both typewriter artists who use the keyboard as a ‘palette’ to create artworks, and artists/typographers using the form as a compositional device. the book will appeal to graphic designers, typographers, artists and illustrators, and anyone fascinated by predigital technology.

i totally love this book, therefore a huge recommendation from my side!

get it here 

newyorker:

Read Cirocco Dunlap’s humorous piece on the Sims you left behind: http://nyr.kr/1j78Kdj

“Following your departure, we were physically unable to do anything. Newspaper after newspaper piled up without anyone to click ‘Recycle.’ We had refrigerators and ovens but no one to tell us to use them. After several years of this hell, Mr. Dumb Stupidass—the first Sim you created—discovered a way to leave his house without you.”

Illustration: The Sims.

newyorker:

Read Cirocco Dunlap’s humorous piece on the Sims you left behind: http://nyr.kr/1j78Kdj

“Following your departure, we were physically unable to do anything. Newspaper after newspaper piled up without anyone to click ‘Recycle.’ We had refrigerators and ovens but no one to tell us to use them. After several years of this hell, Mr. Dumb Stupidass—the first Sim you created—discovered a way to leave his house without you.”

Illustration: The Sims.

(Source: newyorker.com)

newyorker:

Parul Sehgal on Muriel Spark’s genius: http://nyr.kr/1n0qlbz

“Spark was fascinated by suffering—and even tried writing a critical study of the Book of Job—but it was an active, robust kind of suffering she liked, whereby hunger whetted one’s wits. Her women are not enamored of their anxiety, their moods and wounds. If they’re poor and powerless, it’s in the way of a junkyard dog, with a restless, scavenging instinct, a loyalty to no one and breathtaking cunning.”

Photograph by Brooke DiDonato.

newyorker:

Parul Sehgal on Muriel Spark’s genius: http://nyr.kr/1n0qlbz

“Spark was fascinated by suffering—and even tried writing a critical study of the Book of Job—but it was an active, robust kind of suffering she liked, whereby hunger whetted one’s wits. Her women are not enamored of their anxiety, their moods and wounds. If they’re poor and powerless, it’s in the way of a junkyard dog, with a restless, scavenging instinct, a loyalty to no one and breathtaking cunning.”

Photograph by Brooke DiDonato.

(Source: newyorker.com)

historicaltimes:

Babies are strapped into airplane seats enroute to LAX during “Operation Babylift” with airlifted orphans from Vietnam to the US. April 12, 1975.

historicaltimes:

Babies are strapped into airplane seats enroute to LAX during “Operation Babylift” with airlifted orphans from Vietnam to the US. April 12, 1975.

(via blackandwhiteandwtf)

newyorker:

This past week, George Saunders won both the Story Prize and the inaugural Folio Prize for his latest collection, “Tenth of December.” Read his short story, “Jon,” a satire about advertising and consumerism: http://nyr.kr/NejRc9
Photograph by David Levenson/Getty.

newyorker:

This past week, George Saunders won both the Story Prize and the inaugural Folio Prize for his latest collection, “Tenth of December.” Read his short story, “Jon,” a satire about advertising and consumerism: http://nyr.kr/NejRc9

Photograph by David Levenson/Getty.

(Source: newyorker.com)

It’s not hard to see why Pancake has become a sort of secular saint for some writers. Writing is an act of faith. Writers face endless rejection, constant self-doubt. For many writers, practicing their art requires a vow of poverty or, at the very least, a vow of doing without. Pancake suffered through all of this and more, and yet he was delivered to the afterlife of publication and acclaim.

Jon Michaud on Breece D’J Pancake: http://nyr.kr/MwuerT (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)